Supporting details writing activities

Print this page The descriptions that follow are not standards themselves but instead offer a portrait of students who meet the standards set out in this document. As students advance through the grades and master the standards in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language, they are able to exhibit with increasing fullness and regularity these capacities of the literate individual.

Supporting details writing activities

The Verb Recognize a verb when you see one. Verbs are a necessary component of all sentences. Verbs have two important functions: Some verbs put stalled subjects into motion while other verbs help to clarify the subjects in meaningful ways.

Look at the examples below: My grumpy old English teacher smiled at the plate of cold meatloaf. The daredevil cockroach splashed into Sara's soup. Theo's overworked computer exploded in a spray of sparks. The curious toddler popped a grasshopper into her mouth.

The important thing to remember is that every subject in a sentence must have a verb. Otherwise, you will have written a fragmenta major writing error. Consider word function when you are looking for a verb.

In Certain Places

Many words in English have more than one function. Sometimes a word is a nounsometimes a verb, sometimes a modifier.

supporting details writing activities

As a result, you must often analyze the job a word is doing in the sentence. Look at these two examples: Potato chips crunch too loudly to eat during an exam. The crunch of the potato chips drew the angry glance of Professor Orsini to our corner of the room. Crunch is something that we can do.

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We can crunch cockroaches under our shoes. We can crunch popcorn during a movie. We can crunch numbers for a math class.

In the first sentence, then, crunch is what the potato chips do, so we can call it a verb. Even though crunch is often a verb, it can also be a noun.

supporting details writing activities

The crunch of the potato chips, for example, is a thing, a sound that we can hear. You therefore need to analyze the function that a word provides in a sentence before you determine what grammatical name to give that word.

Know an action verb when you see one. What are these words doing? They are expressing action, something that a person, animal, force of nature, or thing can do. As a result, words like these are called action verbs.

Clyde sneezes with the force of a tornado. Sneezing is something that Clyde can do. Because of the spoiled mayonnaise, Ricky vomited potato salad all day. Vomiting is something that Ricky can do—although he might not enjoy it.

Sylvia always winks at cute guys driving hot cars. Winking is something that Sylvia can do. The telephone rang with shrill, annoying cries.

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Ringing is something that the telephone can do. Thunder boomed in the distance, sending my poor dog scrambling under the bed. Booming is something that thunder can do.Eighth grade language arts Here is a list of language arts skills students learn in eighth grade!

These skills are organized into categories, and you can move your mouse over any skill name to . English Language Arts Standards» Introduction» Students Who are College and Career Ready in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, & Language.

Is your school using the new Common Core standards? This is a big change for students — and their parents. Get to know the four "anchors" of the Common Core writing standards and simple things you can do at home to help your child build skills in all of these areas.

Jan 13,  · Practice using supporting details that complement the main idea with this practice page/5(14). Hello Amelon Bulldogs and Families, Welcome to the school year! I am honored to continue to serve Amelon in the Assistant Principal role and look forward to continuing my work with Mr.

Sales, as well as the rest of our staff, in our efforts to do whatever it takes to advance the achievement of all students in our school. © Margot Southall 3 Reference Fountas, Irene C. and Gay Su Pinnell.

Guiding Readers and Writers: Teaching Comprehension, Genre and Content Literacy (Grades 3.

Directives Division