A history of blues music

Delta blues musician Many blues elements, such as the call-and-response format and the use of blue notes, can be traced back to the music of Africa. The Diddley bow, a homemade one-stringed instrument found in parts of the American South in the early twentieth century, and the banjo are African-derived instruments that may have helped in the transfer of African performance techniques into the early blues instrumental vocabulary. Blues music later adopted elements from the "Ethiopian airs", minstrel shows and Negro spirituals, including instrumental and harmonic accompaniment.

A history of blues music

Beforethe music of the sixties still reflected the sound, style and beliefs of the previous decade and many of the hit records were by artists who had found mainstream success in the s, like Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Dion, and The Everly Brothers.

In and the years to follow, a number of social influences changed what popular music was and gave birth to the diversity that we experience with music today.

History of Jamaican Music You lose your job, you get the blues. Your mate falls out of love with you, you get the blues.
s Music History including Sixties Styles, Bands And Artists The booming nightclubs, theaters, restaurants, stores, pawnshops and hot music thrived alongside gambling, drinking, prostitution, murder and voodoo. In the early evenings, boxback suits and Stetson hats mingled with overalls.
Music Styles, Bands And Artists during the 1960's Best self produced CD: Louis artists and the whats what in STL music scene.
Sorry! Something went wrong! Muddy Waters The origins of blues is not unlike the origins of life.
Blues Hall of Fame Museum Origins of the blues The first publication of blues sheet music may have been "I Got the Blues", published by New Orleans musician Antonio Maggio in and described as "the earliest published composition known to link the condition of having the blues to the musical form that would become popularly known as 'the blues.

The assassination of President Kennedy, the escalation of the war in Vietnam and the forward-progress of the Civil Rights Movement all greatly impacted the mood of American culture and the music began to reflect that change. The "British Invasion" also began around with the arrival of The Beatles on the music scene and the type of rabid fandom that followed them would change the way people would view and interact with music and musicians forever.

As these bands gained popularity, many of them ventured into new music territory and created their own unique styles.

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The one band that comes to mind when speaking of the British Invasion is The Beatles, who first broke into the US music scene inbut really became popular in after appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show.

The Beatles dominated worldwide charts from that point in time until they broke up in The phenomenon that surrounded them was known as Beatlemania and many up and coming music acts emulated their "Liverpool Sound".

The band holds many musical records to this day reflecting album sales and number one singles and they're music remains some of the most popular of all time.

They can be easily described as the most influential group of the 's. Motown started as a Detroit-based record label in the late fifties and early sixties, but it quickly turned into much more as the acts gained popularity worldwide. Motown records consisted mainly of African-American groups, singers, songwriters and management and their musical and business success proved in breaking down the barriers of segregation and granted African-American performers and musicians a chances to reappropriate much of the success that had been credited to white rock 'n' rollers and pop artists who had success in singing "black music" during the previous decade.

Two of the most influential groups to come out of the Motown sound were Smokey Robinson and the Miracles and Diana Ross and the Supremes, both of which had as much chart success as any of the rock groups that dominated the airwaves during the sixties. Rock and its Subgenres While rock 'n' roll music entered the popular music spectrum in the s, rock music really came into its own in the s.

Rock music dominated the popular music scene during the decade and as the genre grew and changed, many diverse and new subgenres emerged, all tied to original rock but each with their own unique style and purpose.

These specific subgenres also had varying levels of popularity throughout the decade and many are still popular today. Quite a few rock bands and musicians oscillated between these genres depending on what was popular at the time and used it as a way to experiment with finding their own true sound.

Some of the rock subgenres that we will touch upon are surf, psychedelic, roots, and hard rock. It is important to remember that the specific artists we discuss in these various sections often fall into more than one category and it is up for debate amongst their fans what genre they best represent.

We have tried our best to categorize these artists and realize there was much cross-over during the decade. Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock Surf rock began in Southern California as a type of dance music that was mostly instrumental and it became quite popular in the early to mid sixties, until the British Invasion took over the music scene.

The subject matter for surf rock was quite literally surfing, however, that expanded as the genre grew in popularity to songs about girls, cars and general teenage antics.

The most influential and popular group to come out of the genre were The Beach Boys, whose vocal harmonies and well-crafted compositions came to define the genre. The Beach Boys were one of the only bands to come out of the genre and sustain their success.

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Psychedelic rock was popular during the latter half of the s and reached its peak at the end of the decade. Psychedelic music was associated with the hippie counter-culture and hallucinogenic drug use and it was created with the intention of "enhancing" the experience of listeners who were using LSD or other mind-altering substances.

The lyrics were often strange and made reference to drugs and bands would often use instruments that were not usual, like the sitar, tabla, harpsichord and organ.

There was much experimentation in the sound and much of it was influenced by Eastern and Indian music. Psychedelic rock along with Folk rock became two of the most recognizable sounds associated with 's "Summer of Love" phenomenon.

A history of blues music

Roots Rock and Hard Rock Roots rock emerged in the mid to late s as a combination of several genres and subgenres of rock music that were popular at the time. Roots rock combined elements of folk music, blues, country and rock 'n' roll.

A history of blues music

And, the genre was exemplified by its "back to basics" sound. Bob Dylan is thought to have pioneered the genre with the release of his album Blonde on Blonde that demonstrated what roots rock was to become.

Many of the most popular bands of the time joined the "roots revival" and crafted albums of their own that featured and experimented with a roots sound. Hard rock took the elements of rock 'n' roll and made them heavier as the genre formed in the middle of the decade.

The sound is characterized by more aggressive tones and delivery.The beginnings: New Orleans TM, ®, Copyright © Piero Scaruffi All rights reserved.. Jazz music was, ultimately, the product of New Orleans' melting pot.

At the. s: Slave trade brings West African rhythms, chants and song structures to America, which leads to the advent of blues, jazz and negro spirituals.

The History Of The Blues: The Roots, The Music, The People [Francis Davis] on leslutinsduphoenix.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Francis Davis's The History of the Blues is a groundbreaking rethinking of the blues that fearlessly examines how race relations have altered perceptions of the music.

Tracing its origins from the Mississippi Delta to its amplification in Chicago right after World War II. The history of the blues and the origin of the blues is really an evolution of the blues from the unaccompanied vocal music and oral traditions of African-American slaves and rural blacks into a wide variety of styles and subgenres, with regional variations .

Blues History Blues is an American Heritage, and it should be noted as such. Blues is a musical art form with it's own distinct musical progressions and much more.

Blues is a music genre and musical form originated in the Deep South of the United States around the s. The genre developed from roots, and spirituals. Blues incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads. The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the.

Blues - Wikipedia